Useful contacts
 You may find many of these websites, articles and books useful for your own personal birth research (there are 5 categories below), but please note that this is not an exhaustive list. To recommend any other useful contacts, please get in touch.

CESAREAN WEBSITES

*About cesarean childbirth
American College of Surgeons booklet.
*aims.org.uk
This organisation is 'working towards normal birth' but it does list some interesting articles and statistics.
*American College of Surgeons
7 page PDF brochure providing information on the cesarean operation itself.
*babycentre.co.uk
This has a short Q&A section on cesareans.
*babyworld.co.uk
General information on cesarean birth and a community chat room facility.
*BBC Parenting
Virtual tours of delivery suites.
*BBC Parenting
Q&A information on cesareans.
*caesareanbirth.com
While concentrating on planning ahead in case of an emergency cesarean, this also has very useful information for all women having a cesarean.
*Caesarean chatter on Bellybelly.com
Very supportive forum.
*caesarean.org.uk
FAQs, a reading list, birth reports from women who have had caesareans, a cesarean birth plan and photographs of cesarean scars that have been sent in by women.
*caesarian.lifetips.com 'Our Gurus'
Women write in and offer advice to others.
*Cesarean Section Test, Health A-Z
*C-Section Interactive Tutorial
Patient Education Institute on Medline (requires Flash Player).
*C-Section Recovery
Practical tips for cesarean recovery put together by a mother who has had a cesarean birth.
*csections.org
Information about women's rights when requesting and refusing a cesarean; the procedure and recovery and discussion forums to discuss childbirth and cesareans.
*Having a baby, Birth: Caesarean Section
Information on cesareans.
*healthgrades.com
Patient-choice cesarean data with Hospital Quality Ratings for Obstetric Services.
*ivillage.co.uk
Short but useful explanation about cesareans.
*Medline Plus
Information on cesareans.
*mothersbliss.com
General Q&A style information on cesarean birth.
*netdoctor.co.uk
Q&A style information about having a cesarean.
*nhsdirect.nhs.uk
Cesarean information on the NHS Direct website.
*nctpregnancyandbabycare.com
Cesarean information on the National Childbirth Trust website.
*obgyn.net
Choosing Cesarean Birth: An alternative to today’s Crisis in Natural Childbirth? By Magnus Murphy, MD. This is an excellent resource for researching information about cesareans.
*obgyn.net/transcript
This is a transcript of a discussion between Magnus Murphy, MD and Barbara Nesbitt, on the subject of his book, ‘Pelvic Health and Childbirth.’ Very useful and informative.
*omni.org
‘Gateway to high quality Internet resources in Health and Medicine’. This contains a list of links to a wide range of different sources on the subject of cesareans.
*painfreebirthing.com
Brief historical evolution of childbirth pain relief where ‘basic concepts of pain during childbirth and pain relief are discussed with picture animations to facilitate easy understanding.’
*pelvicfloor.com
This is Magnus Murphy’s own website, dedicated to pelvic floor issues. He maintains that choosing a cesarean for personal choice alone is completely acceptable and fully supports a woman’s right to choose.
*pregnancy.about.com
This has a series of photographs showing a cesarean operation and also links to planning a ‘Family Centred Cesarean Birth,’ which is useful.
*RCOG List of publications on cesareans
Interesting list worth a browse.
*specialstartbirth.com
Provides information on VBAC and repeat cesarean delivery with an emphasis on supporting each woman's individual preference or choice.
*surgerydoor.co.uk
Definition of a cesarean.
*vbac.org.uk
In here, if you click on ‘Planning a good caesarean’ in the UK Midwifery archives, one woman writes: 'If you decide to go for an elective section, which is hard when you want a natural delivery, all I can say is that it is a very different experience to an emergency, and it can be very special; mine was wonderful. I recovered very quickly, very different to the emergency section, and breastfed well.'

*webmd.com

Cesarean Section - Topic Overview.
*What you need to know about Caesarean Birth
March of Dimes website.
*Women’s Health
Q&A on cesareans.

CESAREAN BOOKS

*Choosing Cesarean Birth: An alternative to today's Crisis in Natural Childbirth? Magnus Murphy, MD, Specialist Obstetrician and Gynecologist in British Colombia, Canada: 'Unfortunately, vaginal childbirth may lead to severe damage of the pelvic floor and its component structures, with resultant negative effects... My suggested solution is going to be a controversial one [elective cesarean births]... we are compelled to work on the assumption that all women are at risk, and should at least be informed in order to make an empowered, personal, and calculated decision about childbirth.'
*Magnus Murphy, MD & Barbara Nesbitt discuss his new book, Pelvic Health & Childbirth; also authored by Carol L. Wasson (September 2003)
*Caesarean Birth in Britain, 10 Years on: A Book for Health Professionals and Parents (Health S.), Colin Francome, et al - Middlesex University Press (September 2005)

*Cesarean Section: Understanding and Celebrating Your Baby's Birth Michele C. Moore, et al - The Johns Hopkins University Press (June 2003)
*Just Take It Out!: The Ethics and Economics of Cesarean Section and Hysterectomy Edward Quillinan (Foreword), D. Campbell Walters - Topiary Publishing (February 1999): Described as a ‘sensitive pro-woman book’ with real life stories and comic scenarios. It tackles taboo subjects like stillbirth, sex after childbirth, and re-assures women who have had a cesarean that they are good mothers and have not robbed themselves or their newborn child of anything.
ec note May 29, 1999. A practicing ob-gyn from Houston, Texas recommends the book: ‘There is already too much extremism on the left of these issues. The demand for cesarean deliveries and hysterectomies is patient driven and not physician driven. In fact, these procedures are both safe and life altering. The impression that doctors are victimizing their patients to get rich is widespread and false. A must read for ob-gyn doctors and the patients they care for.’
*Worry Free C-Section Elizabeth McGee, B.A. Psychology
*Caesarean Birth, your questions answered NCT/Chipping Derrick, Lowdon, Barlow (2004): Answers commonly asked questions about having a baby by caesarean, and about information wanted before birth or information and support after the birth.
*Pelvic Health and Childbirth: What Every Woman Needs to Know Magnus Murphy and Carol L. Wasson
*Ever Since I Had My Baby: Understanding, Treating, and Preventing the Most Common Physical Aftereffects of Pregnancy and Childbirth Roger P. Goldberg
*What to expect when you’re expecting Heidi Murkoff, Arlene Eisenberg & Sandee Hathaway, B.S.N.
p298/9: ‘Cesareans are nearly as safe as vaginal deliveries for the mother, and in difficult deliveries, or where there’s fetal distress, they are often the safest delivery mode for the baby. Even though it is technically considered major surgery, a cesarean carries relatively minor risks - closer to those of a tonsillectomy than of a gallbladder operation for instance - that can generally be treated easily. Cesareans aren’t inherently dangerous for the baby, either. In fact, when a surgical delivery is truly necessary, the baby is at least safe, and often safer, arriving that way rather than through the vaginal route. Every year thousands of babies who might not have survived the journey through the birth canal (or might have survived impaired) are lifted from an incision in their mothers’ abdomens sound and unscathed.’
p299: 'Apgar scores, which rate an infant’s condition one and five minutes after birth, are comparable in babies born vaginally and those born by cesarean. Cesarean-born babies do have the slight disadvantage of not having some of the excess mucus squeezed out of their respiratory tracts in the birthing process, but this mucus can be easily suctioned after delivery. Though minor lacerations do occasionally occur during a surgical delivery, especially when the baby is in a breech position or the membranes are already ruptured, only very, very rarely is any serious damage sustained by a baby during a cesarean delivery - much more rarely than during vaginal deliveries.'
*The Essential C-Section Guide: Pain Control, Healing at Home, Getting Your Body Back, and Everything Else You need to Know about a Cesarean Birth Maureen Connolly (June 2004)
*Caesarean Recovery Chrissie Gallegher-Mundy, Carrol and Brown (2004): A day-by-day illustrated guide to exercising and gaining energy after a cesarean (said to contain some inaccuracies in the non-exercise based information).
*The Caesarean Myth: Choosing the best way to have your baby Mortimer Rosen MD and Lillian Thomas, Penguin (1989): American book by an obstetrician who discusses cesarean issues in a gentle informative manner.
*The Caesarean Michel Odent - Michel Odent - Free Association Books (2004): Looks at the history and the reasons why the rate may have climbed so quickly, as well as considering the impact such a large move to this way of birth may have on society.
*The Caesarean Experience Sarah Clement, Pandora (1995)
A psychologist’s view on feelings about having a cesarean.
*Caesarean Childbirth Wilson Christine, Signet (New American Library)
*Caesarean Birth in Britain Dr Colin Francome, Professor Wendy Savage, Helen Churchill and Helen Lewison, Middlesex University Press (1993): Gives the history of caesareans, how we have come to where we are today, reasons for having a caesarean, what will happen, and VBAC.
*The Well-Informed Patient's Guide to Caesarean Births (Dell Surgical Library) Kathryn Cox, Judith Schwartz - Dell Pub Co (April 1991)
*Caesarean Birth Kathleen Mitchell, Marty Nason, Beaufort Books, Publishers, US (June 1990)
*You and Your Caesarean Birth Trisha Duffett- Smith, Sheldon P (May 1985)
*Caesarean Birth: Guide for Parents Melissa Brooks, Michael Rogers, Ebury Press (March 9, 1989)
*Caesarean Birth: Experience, Practice & History Helen Churchill, Ph D, Books for Midwives Press, Hochland & Hochland Ltd (1997): Examines women's experiences of caesarean birth from its origins through to present day. Gives a detailed history of caesareans, looks at debates on women/medical professional relationships and women's experiences of caesareans.
*Caesarean Birth Experience: A Practical, Comprehensive and Reassuring Guide for Parents and Professionals Bonnie Donovan, Beacon P, US (August 1978)
*Unnecessary Cesarean Sections: How to Cure a National Epidemic: Cesarean Section Rates for the United States (41 States and 2,388 Hospitals in 30 states) Lynn Silver, Public Citizen Group (December 1989)
*Not of Woman Born: Representations of Caesarean Birth in Medieval and Renaissance Culture Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski - Cornell University Press (December 1991)


CHILDBIRTH TRAUMA SUPPORT

*aims.org.uk/journal Article on post traumatic stress disorder, specifically as a consequence of childbirth.
*apni.org
Service for women, their families, friends and professionals, offering advice and information, a network of volunteers and a helpline.
*bacp.co.uk
List of private counsellors in your area, and information on counselling and choosing a counsellor.
*birthtraumaassociation.org.uk
Offers support for women who have had a traumatic birth experience.
*birthtraumacanada.org
Offers support for women in Canada who have had a traumatic birth experience.
*cry-sis.com
Support for families with excessively crying, sleepless and demanding babies and young children, and a helpline with information on local volunteer contacts.
*depressionalliance.org
National network of self-help groups for people experiencing depression. There is a newsletter, pen friend scheme, and booklets and leaflets.
*mama.org.uk
Network of groups and individuals providing friendship and support for mothers and pregnant women who are isolated and lonely. There is a helpline, and leaflets and booklets are available for a small charge.
*mind.org.uk
Campaigns for better mental health services, and has books, leaflets and details of local groups.
*rcpsych.ac.uk
Has a factsheet on postnatal depression and how it can be treated.
*sheilakitzinger.com
helpline for women who need to talk to someone about their birth experience. Also links to related articles and references.
Midlands: Sheila Kitzinger 01865 300266
South West: Debbie Harrison 01275 542652
London: Heather Allan 020 7485 4725
Glasgow: Mary Kennedy 0141 9467537
Manchester: Julie Kurutac 0161 434 4563
Evenings only: Muriel O'Driscoll 0151 9280596


GENERAL WELLBEING WEBSITES

*ability.org.uk
List of Local Health Authorities with notes next to them.
*acog.org
*aims.org.uk
*americanbaby.com
Useful site on a wide range of issues and a great search facility. ec view It's a shame about all the pop-ups.
*asbah.org
Provides information and advice to individuals, families and carers.
*ash.org.uk
*askmen.com
Advice and articles on a wide range of topics, including Health & Sports, Sexuality, Fashion & Lifestyle, Dating & Love. ec view The search facility is good and the article Pregnancy, a man's guide is worth a look.
*asthma.org.uk
Provides information and advice to people with asthma.
*avma.org.uk
Independent charity promoting better patient safety and justice for people who have been affected by a medical accident.
*babylifeline.org.uk
Information on care for unborn and newborn babies.
*Baby Safety Week
National health campaign to raise awareness of SIDS - cot death - and provide... potentially life-saving advice [through FSID].
*bdfcharity.co.uk
Birth Defects children’s charity, which provides special nurse services and grants.
*birth.com.au

Australian website with information on pregnancy and birth.
*bliss.org.uk
Information and support for parents of premature babies.
*chai.org.uk
Independent inspection body for NHS, private and voluntary healthcare, and acts as an independent review body for NHS complaints. Also has a section on cosmetic surgery advice.
*choiceinchildbirth.org
Patient-lead campaign to ensure that pregnant women are given complete, unbiased information about and access to the full range of established pain relief options when giving birth.
*coalitionforchildbirthautonomy.org
Campaign for women’s autonomy in making an informed decision about how and where they give birth, and for these to be respected equally whether they are home, hospital, vaginal or caesarean deliveries.
*cfttrust.org.uk
Provides support for people with Cystic Fibrosis.
*downs-syndrome.org.uk
Help for people with Down’s syndrome.
*drfoster.co.uk
Independent organisation, which collects and analyses information on the availability and quality of NHS and selected private hospitals.
*eating during pregnancy
*eczema.org
Provides information and support for people with eczema.
*fasaware.co.uk
Provides information and support to parents, including unmarried parents, of either sex.
*franklypregnant.com
A weekly, real-life account of one woman's pregnancy in the US.
*galactosaemia.com
*gbss.org.uk
Offers information and support to pregnant women and families affected by GBS… the most common cause of life-threatening infections in newborn babies in the UK.
Provides help for 3.5m lone parent families.
*gmc-uk.org
Regulatory body with general and specialist registers of all doctors qualified to practise in the UK, and free information on specific, named doctors and their fitness to practise.
*healthykids.com
Looks like the sister site to americanbaby.com. ec note Lots of useful information... and more pop-ups.
*helpfordepression.com

Help for Depression provides a comprehensive explanation of the various approaches and treatments for depression as a critical starting point for individuals and/or their loved ones.
*ihf.org.uk
*infertilitynetworkuk.com
*ivillage.co.uk
Information network for women in the UK, which focuses on issues that matter most to women and offers interactive services, expert advice, information and a support network.
*maternityalliance.org.uk
Information on maternity services, benefits and rights at work.
*mencap.org.uk

Support and information for people with a learning disability, and their families and carers.
*meningitis-trust.org
Provides information on meningitis and offers support to people affected by it.
*midirs.org
Midwives Information and Resource Service.
*miscarriageassociation.org.uk
Provides support and information for those suffering the effects of pregnancy loss.
*nas.org.uk
Provides information and advice about autism and Asperger syndrome.
*ncma.org.uk
Promotes quality home-based childcare.
*nctpregnancyandbabycare.com
National Childbirth Trust information and support in pregnancy, childbirth and early parenthood, with helplines, leaflets and books.
*nelh.nhs.uk
Useful search facility; NeLH is working with NHS libraries to develop a digital library for NHS staff, patients and the public.
*netmums.com
A local network for mums by mums with a wealth of information and advice on being a mum with young children in your home town (in the UK).
*nhs.uk
Country specific options available, wide range of information and a search facility.
*nofas-uk.org
Provides information and support to individuals, families and carers.
*oneparentfamilies.org.uk
Provides information based on the laws and benefits system.
*parentlineplus.org.uk
Offers help and support… shaped by parents for parents.
*patients-association.com
Advice on your rights, information about current campaigns, a helpline and booklets (e.g. how to make a complaint or get access to your health records).
*pregnancy timeline, BBC Health
*pyramidofantenatalchange.org
POAC (PYRAMID OF ANTENATAL CHANGE) is a newly established charity (2012) whose aim is to save the lives of infants by reducing the number of stillbirths.
*raisingkids.co.uk
Offers support, information, and friendship to everyone who's raising kids - whatever your circumstances or income.
*rcog.org.uk
Aim is to set standards to improve women's health.
*rnib.org.uk
Offers information, support and advice to people with sight problems.
*scope.org.uk
Support and information for people with cerebral palsy.
*sense.org.uk
Provides advice and support for families of deaf-blind children.
*sicklecellsociety.org
Information and advice for people affected by sickle cell disease.
*sids.org.uk
Provides support and advice about cot death.
*tommys-campaign.org
Researches prevention of miscarriage, stillbirth and premature birth.
*uk-sands.org
Supports bereaved parents and families.
*washingtonparent.com
Useful website with articles written by professionals in the fields of child development, education, arts and special needs etc. It also publishes 10 Guides annually, on Education, Camps, Parties, Child Care, Enrichment Activities, Children’s Wellness and Arts.
*wellbeing.org.uk
Information about women’s reproductive problems.
*yourbirthchoice.com
Research study examining the health beliefs of first time mother’s making decisions about their childbirth - as at August 2009, actively recruiting survey participants.
*10 Secrets to an Easier Labor, Parents.com

SURGERY WEBSITES

*baaps.org.uk
Advice and information about aesthetic plastic surgery and a search facility for accredited surgeons.
*babtac.com
Professional body for beauty therapists, which you can contact to check a practitioner is qualified.
*b-a-c-s.co.uk
Represents surgeons who undertake cosmetic surgery, but who may not have completed the specialist training required in the UK for new cosmetic surgeons wishing to work in this field. BACS represents many of the surgeons working for private clinics or hospitals that advertise directly to the public.
*baps.co.uk
Professional representative body for plastic and re-constructive surgeons in the UK with advice, a reading list and articles on treatments.
*consultingroom.org
Aims to demystify the world of cosmetic treatments.
*cosmeticdoctors.co.uk
Aims to represent cosmetic practitioners and maintain standards to benefit doctors and the public. Has a search facility and information on different non-surgical treatments.
*drmatlock.com
Information on the procedure of vaginal re-sculpture and rejuvenation through laser surgery and FAQs.
*embarrassingproblems.com
Advice on what to think about when considering cosmetic surgery and on choosing a reputable surgeon.
*lcas.com
*patientadvisory.co.uk
Information, advice and support to people considering cosmetic surgery.
*plasticsurgery.org
Information about different types of cosmetic operation and up-to-date procedures being carried out in the USA.
*rcseng.ac.uk
Questions about the differences between plastic and cosmetic surgeons, and how to check your doctor is properly qualified.